COVID-19 Testing and Vaccination

Edinburgh Center

Vaccinations Only

911 East Main Cross Street
Edinburgh, IN 46124-1501

We respond to our community’s need for protective vaccines. Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that can cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe respiratory illnesses. The novel coronavirus or COVID-19 was first identified in December of 2019 and has spread to throughout the world. COVID-19 vaccinations are available at this location.

WindRose Health Network

COVID-19 Testing

Testing is available at each of our locations. Please contact the office closest to you for more information.

COVID-19 Vaccination

Schedule an Appointment or Walk-In

Call 317.680.9901 or register at www.ourshot.in.gov. Walk-in appointments are welcome.

How to Prepare for Your Vaccination

Upon arrival, look for dedicated vaccine parking signs and park your vehicle. Enter the facility through the side entrance door. Bring your state-issued photo identification (ID) card and insurance card. A mask must be worn to cover your mouth and your nose during the visit.

How Much Time Vaccination Takes

Plan on spending between 25 to 35 minutes during your visit. Please note this is an estimated timeframe.

Can I Get COVID From the Vaccine?

No, you cannot. The vaccine gives our body practice recognizing the virus and safely developing an immune response against it. None of the vaccines are live virus vaccines. Learn More

Next Steps

During your visit, you will be scheduled to come back for your second and final vaccination dose of Moderna.

Hours for Vaccines

Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

WindRose Health Network

COVID-19 VACCINE FAQ’S

What does the COVID-19 vaccine do?

It helps your body to make antibodies and build immunity to fight the virus and stop you from becoming infected with COVID-19 if you are exposed to it.

What is in the vaccine?

The Moderna and Pfizer vaccine contain COVID-19 mRNA.

Will mRNA get into my DNA?

No. mRNA never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA (genetic material) is kept.

How do the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work?

COVID-19 mRNA vaccines give instructions for our cells to make a piece of what is called the “spike protein.” The spike protein is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. After the protein piece is made, the cell breaks down the mRNA instructions and gets rid of them. Next, the cell displays the protein piece on its surface. Our immune systems recognize that the protein doesn’t belong there and begin building an immune response by making antibodies, like what happens in natural infection against COVID-19.

Will the vaccine give me COVID-19?

No. mRNA vaccines do not use the live virus that causes COVID-19. You can’t get infected or infect anyone else from getting the vaccine.

If I get the vaccine, does this mean that I will never get COVID-19?

No. Although the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are estimated to be about 95% effective in preventing infection with COVID-19 there is still a small chance that you could become infected. It is still recommended to wear masks, social distance and wash your hands frequently for added protection after getting the vaccine.

Will I always have to wear a mask and social distance?

No, but wearing a mask a little longer is the safer thing to do. Hopefully, enough people will become vaccinated that we will have what is called “herd immunity”. This means that there are enough people in the community who have immunity to COVID-19 that the infection rate will drop and eventually the virus will die out because it has no people who can become infected.

Can I trust the vaccines?

Yes. Although it seems like the vaccines were developed quickly actually researchers have been studying and working with mRNA vaccines for decades. As soon as the necessary information about the virus that causes COVID-19 was available, scientists began designing the mRNA instructions for cells to build the unique spike protein into an mRNA vaccine. mRNA vaccines have been held to the same standards as all other types of vaccines in the United States. Thousands of volunteers were given the vaccine prior to it being given emergency use authorization by the FDA.

Are there side effects?

Some people may get temporary side effects as with any vaccine. These are usually a sign that your body is working to produce antibodies that will give you immunity.

What are the possible common side effects?

Pain, redness or swelling at the injection site.
Fatigue, malaise.
Headache.
Muscle and/or joint pain and aches.
Fever, chills.
Swollen lymph nodes.

How long do side effects last?

Usually 24 to 48 hours and are more common after the second dose.

How many doses are needed?

Two doses of the same vaccine are needed. The first dose helps your body to start making antibodies and the second dose is a booster to increase levels of the antibodies.

How long after getting vaccinated will I be protected from COVID-19?

It takes two weeks after the second dose to have a good level of protection. However, it is best to continue to wear masks, social distance and wash your hands often. This helps protect you from variant strains and protects people who are not yet vaccinated.

Will the vaccine protect me from variant strains?

We don’t have the full answer to that question yet. However, it is looking hopeful that is does protect against some of the present variant strains.

Can I get the vaccine if I have allergies?

Yes. Talk to the person ordering or scheduling it. If you have ever had an anaphylactic reaction it is important to let the person giving you the injection know and for you to stay for the full 15-minute observation period.

Can children get the vaccine?

At this time children need to be 12 or older can get the Pfizer vaccine. A person must be 18 to get the Moderna vaccine. Research is ongoing to determine the safety of using the vaccines in younger children.

How much does the vaccine cost?

The vaccine is FREE for every person regardless of your immigration status.

Will the vaccine protect me for my lifetime?

The answer to this question is not yet known. It is possible that booster doses may be needed.

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MOBILE VACCINATION CLINIC

Indiana University Health is offering free rides to any COVID-19 vaccine site in the state, this includes WindRose Health Network vaccine sites. Transportation is available to anyone in Indiana. The appointment does not need to be at an IU Health vaccine clinic.

How It Works

  • If you need transportation to your vaccine appointment, call 1.888.IUHEALTH (1.888.484.3258) and select option 9.
  • Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday.
  • Callers will be asked if they have insurance in case their insurance provider already covers the cost of transportation.
  • If the caller doesn’t have insurance or their plan doesn’t cover transportation, an IU Health team member will coordinate a ride based on the caller’s scheduled appointment and location.
  • IU Health is partnering with Lyft to facilitate most of these rides. In areas that don’t have Lyft, IU Health is working with other transportation providers.

Rides are provided at no cost to you. Callers will be asked if they have insurance in case their insurance provider already covers the cost of transportation. Interpreters from IU Health’s Language Services team are available to help if a caller does not speak English.

IU Health was recently awarded a grant from Anthem, Inc., to support transportation to vaccine clinics.

Upcoming Dates and Sites

All clinics will provide the Pfizer vaccine for ages 12 and older. Walk-ins are welcome. If you would like a timely experience, please call to preregister: 317.680.9901. 

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